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March-April 2011
Special Report on Salvage: Global Goods
Technical advances in motor vehicles are making repairs much harder and raising costs. This has the potential to increase instances of fraud and sub-standard repair -- issues that can seriously harm the reputation of the auto recycling industry. How can the global auto recycling industry, whilst keeping costs as low as possible, continue to improve standards, consumer protection, and eradicate fraud?
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Special Report on Salvage: Mobilizing Fairness
The 2009 study titled International Trade in Used Vehicles: The Environmental Consequences of NAFTA, by Lucas W. Davis, Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, and Matthew E. Kahn, UCLA Institute of the Environ- ment, studied the effects of the law since its passage in 1993, including trade patterns. The North American Free Trade Agreement was created to expand trade between the United States, Canada, and Mexico to make them more competitive in the global marketplace. As of January 1, 2008, all tariffs among the three countries were eliminated and trade tripled from $297 billion to $1 trillion between 1993-2007, according to the study.
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Special Report on Salvage: Fleecing Consumers
In a 2009 CNN report, Guiseppe "Joe" Pirrone was on vacation when a relative called to say that the work truck he had purchased for his business was being seized by the police. Pirrone learned that the truck he legally bought in 2008 was actually a stolen vehicle, and he was a victim of a car cloning vehicle theft ring. While the truck was now police evidence, he is still on the hook for the $27,000 loan.
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Special Report on Salvage: National Motor Vehicle Title Information System: Is It The Answer?
Automotive Recycling (AR): How long will it take before NMVTIS makes a significant impact on curbing vehicle fraud in the United States?

Major Greg Terp: NMVTIS is already ....


Special Report on Salvage: Global Goods
Technical advances in motor vehicles are making repairs much harder and raising costs. This has the potential to increase instances of fraud and sub-standard repair -- issues that can seriously harm the reputation of the auto recycling industry. How can the global auto recycling industry, whilst keeping costs as low as possible, continue to improve standards, consumer protection, and eradicate fraud?


Special Report on Salvage: Mobilizing Fairness
The 2009 study titled International Trade in Used Vehicles: The Environmental Consequences of NAFTA, by Lucas W. Davis, Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, and Matthew E. Kahn, UCLA Institute of the Environ- ment, studied the effects of the law since its passage in 1993, including trade patterns. The North American Free Trade Agreement was created to expand trade between the United States, Canada, and Mexico to make them more competitive in the global marketplace. As of January 1, 2008, all tariffs among the three countries were eliminated and trade tripled from $297 billion to $1 trillion between 1993-2007, according to the study.


Special Report on Salvage: Fleecing Consumers
In a 2009 CNN report, Guiseppe "Joe" Pirrone was on vacation when a relative called to say that the work truck he had purchased for his business was being seized by the police. Pirrone learned that the truck he legally bought in 2008 was actually a stolen vehicle, and he was a victim of a car cloning vehicle theft ring. While the truck was now police evidence, he is still on the hook for the $27,000 loan.


Special Report on Salvage: Stakeholder Perspective
Automotive Recycling magazine, in an effort to fully understand the issues surrounding the current marketplace of salvage and allow for varying opinions on the topic, sent questions to seven varying industry stakeholders, all who are members of the Collision Industry Electronic Commerce Association’s (CEICA) Salvage Committee. Here are three responses with their perspective on our questions. We appreciate their participation.


Special Report on Salvage: Marketing American Salvage to International Buyers
The issue of salvage cars leaving the United States market is not a new issue for automotive recyclers. The impact of this increasingly complicated and prevalent issue has surely impacted the bottom line of every auto recycler in some way such as in higher overall salvage costs or a decrease in their salvage parts stock. American auto recyclers are frustrated by the lack of solutions to the problem and are left to navigate the new horizon of salvage as best as they can.


Special Report on Salvage: The Battle for Public Awareness
You may not be aware, but there is a growing assault on the image of recycled auto parts going on right now. A recent full-page advertisement in GM Service Insights magazine portrays a dark seedy image of a mean junkyard dog in front of a pile of old dirty cars (far from an accurate image of today’s professional auto recycling facility) with the headline “Rebuilt, from what?” and text stating, “You may not be getting the whole story. Get it new instead.” Next to the text is a shiny NEW GM engine.


 
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